good coffee, old buildings, hot women... and daft kids.
There's an advantage to staying in a guest house that also serves as student accommodation: free drinks, an easy social life and language practise.

But there are dark sides, too.

People kept telling me Argentinians speak wonderful English... maybe if you pretend not to speak a word of Spanish to begin with. Everyone I've met so far has promptly informed me they speak no English. Nada de nada. Most of the time they assume that as a German, I can't possibly speak English, anyway.

On top of that, travellers are outnumbered by students here. I have a Brazilian couple and an American at my back, but when they are gone, I need to speak to the hostel population. None of which is older than 19, which makes for awkward conversations and hilarious questions:

(my English translations - I still have a faint hope that my Spanish is really that bad that I really misunderstood all of this)

I can only understand American English. British English is a completely different language, like Chinese and Italian.


In Germany, is it allowed to cook Arabic food?


How do you say "Hello" in German?

How can you live in London? It's the most dangerous city in the world!


Do you like Britney Spears? She is way cooler than Shakira!

Electronic music really is the best in the world, isn't it?


But how do you survive without calling your mother every day?

Why did your parents allow you to travel on your own?


Why do you know what people in Colombia talk like?


In Germany, do people talk about Hitler every day?

... yes, hard to top this, but there's also:

I think the capital of Canada is Barcelona.


Yet, this is not a complaint, just an observation. When I was 18, I probably asked people similar country girl kind of questions. It's an amazing place to stay, much better and cheaper than any hostel,  and I won't spend more than an hour or two a day with them. I'm considering it my intense Spanish practise ("Did they REALLY just say that?"). After all, they all speak beautiful Argentinian Spanish (shoshoshosho...) - so they can just talk and I'll pretend to listen.


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